Cusp – Friday Fictioneers

It’s time for Friday Fictioneers. I was delighted to see Lauren Moscato’s picture this week. She had shared this photo on Facebook many moons ago and instantly I thought it would make an excellent prompt for Friday Fictioneers. It took me a long time to bring it to Rochelle. I’m glad to see it here. Lauren always entertains at her blog, Tales of a Charm City Chick.ย Stop by her blog and she’ll make you feel right at home.

Seeing the photo ahead of time doesn’t make writing a story any easier. I lost my father two weeks ago and feel as if I’m living in an alternate reality. This prompt seemed appropriate to capture this idea. I apologize if I am unable to comment on your stories this week. My computer is ill. I will do my best. I may just be reading on my phone.

 

lauren-moscato
Copyright – Lauren Moscato

Cusp

The frame of painted flowers looked wrong in the corner.

“That picture,” said Louise, pointing. “It’s my father’s.”

“It’s yours now. The items remain the same. They’re only rearranged,” the man said as if reading instructions.

Dishes in the cupboard reached higher and new books lined her shelves.

“But that door is different,” Louise said, gazing out of a window at the tops of trees. “It can’t be used.” She looked around and realized she was alone, mumbling to herself as before.

She bolted the door and hung the picture there. It was as good a place for it as any.

***************************

Friday Fictioneers is a weekly writing group that attemtps to write a 100-word story in response to a photo prompt. A big thank you to Rochelle Wisoff-Fields for hosting us each week. Thank you! Thanks to Lauren for allowing me to share her photo.

See this link for more stories from the Fictioneers.

 

Advertisements

81 thoughts on “Cusp – Friday Fictioneers

  1. I’m so sorry for your loss, Amy. “The items remain the same. Theyโ€™re only rearranged” – this line is perfect for the way one must feel after the loss of someone so dear. Your story is well told. Take care. Allcia

    Like

    1. I agree with Alicia. Those two sentences carry a lot of weight. I remember the strange emptiness that came over me after my Dad passed. Spending extra time outdoor in the days that followed was especially therapeutic for me. Writing is also a wonderful outlet. I’m glad you were up for it. May God Bless.

      Like

      1. Thanks, Russell. I wrote those two sentences down first. I made sure I wrote them down before I forgot and sure enough I needed to look at my notebook to remember them. ๐Ÿ™‚ I have so many new items in my house of my dad’s that are surrounding me. They look foreign in my house and, of course, they won’t bring him back. I’m hoping to continue the writing. Thank you for your support.

        Like

    2. That line was the first thing that came into my mind that made sense. You see the items, but all you really want is the return of your loved one. The items can’t make up for the loss. Thanks so much, Alicia.

      Like

  2. I hope that writing will help you work through your grief, Amy. It’s been helpful with mine. It takes time to adjust to “the new normal” of loss and yours is still very fresh. That door is indeed different. Well said!

    Like

    1. I do hope writing helps me. It can’t hurt, right? I’m glad to hear writing helped you. If feels pretty fresh, that’s for sure. I feel like I’m strong, then I fall apart. I know it’s to be expected. It has helped me live in the moment. I will say that. Thanks for your kinds words.

      Like

  3. Dear Amy, Good story and it probably helped get your mind off your enormous loss. I lost my Daddy when I was 32 and my mother when I was 40. This is something you never get over – you just get used to it. I’m so very sorry for your loss. Well done! Nan

    Like

    1. Nan, this is what I hear by many who have lost parents and loved ones. It’s nothing to get over. Your life will just be different. This idea that you must get through it doesn’t really apply here. Thanks for your support. Glad you liked my story.

      Like

  4. You’re walking through another door now, Amy and it changes you forever. That’s not a bad thing, just another thing–in life, and you’ll learn how to move through it eventually, with less pain.

    I loved your story. Much said in very few words and beautifully-written. Be well!

    Like

    1. Another chapter in life, for sure, Brigitte. I expected to walk through this door at some point, just not now. It’s still a shock in some ways, although I moving through so many other emotions as well, just taking it as it comes. I’m glad you enjoyed my story. Thank you so much.

      Like

  5. Gosh, you’ve captured it all right here. This might be one of my favorite Friday Fictioneers, for all you say, and for all you left unsaid. Truly beautiful.
    Wishing you peace today and in the coming months.

    Like

    1. Ah, thanks Jen. That means a lot to me and for this to be your favorite. Thanks for the well wishes. I’m working on it. Taking it slow for now. Thanks for your support.

      Like

  6. This is a great story, a very imaginative use of the photo prompt and I believe incorporates some of your recent experience.

    Amy, I’m so sorry for the loss of your father. As adults, we think we are ready for anything, but we really are not. The loss of a parent at any age is still tragic. I read in another post that your father’s memorial service was laced with wonderful stories, tears and laughter. I think that’s a terrific comfort. One of the funniest and most affectionate stories I ever heard about my dad was at his wake. Even now, 23 years later, I smile when I think of it.

    God bless you, Amy. You’re in my prayers.

    Like

    1. Jan, your comments give me a lot of comfort. I’m reminded why I blog. I have such a great community here. Thanks for your support. You’re exactly right when you say that no matter the age, you are never ready. I’ve never experienced such a direct loss and it’s so hard. His memorial service was a great comfort, too. So many people with nothing but kind words and good memories. We have to hold on to those. Thanks for thinking of me. xo

      Liked by 1 person

  7. I sense the sadness, so writing will help … but more importantly,time will take care of everything … especially if you give yourself and time a chance. Good so see you posting.

    Like

    1. I think writing will help me a lot. I just hope people won’t get too sad with all my sad writing. People tell me time will help, so I will take it as it comes for now. It’s brought me a lot closer to my siblings, I think. We don’t take anything for granted now. Thank you, Frank. Thanks for reading, as always.

      Like

  8. Amy, thank you for sharing the picture and this story. I can’t imagine how difficult it was to write and how you must feel. You have been in my thoughts over the last couple of weeks.

    I’m glad you wrote, although I am sorry it was under these circumstances. Thanks for inspiring me and maybe even Renee!

    Like

    1. Thank you, Lauren. It’s just so interesting that of all times that it would surface would be now. I only recently gave the photo to Rochelle, but it was before my father’s death. So, here we are. I never dreamed I would write this story. I think it’s a great prompt. Thanks for sharing it with me. Thanks for all your support and for keeping me in your thoughts. xo

      Liked by 1 person

    1. You speak the truth. It never can be the same. It’s as close to an alternate reality as I’ve ever had. I’m trying to move forward with a more meaningful life. Hopefully, in some ways, I can make other things better. Thanks for all your support, Perry.

      Like

  9. Writing helps me get through the loss of my husband this past December. I truly hope it helps you. My deepest condolences to you. Your story is lovely.

    Like

    1. I’m glad to hear that, Dale. I’m truly sorry for your loss as well. I will keep writing. I think it will help and certainly my wonderful blogging friends are such a comfort. Thanks for being here.

      Liked by 1 person

  10. Beautiful story, very apt title.
    I lost my father a few years ago and I have moved on, but it’s a strange thing that I almost didn’t want to.
    Take the time that you need, don’t rush things. MJx

    Like

    1. Thank you. I’m so sorry for your loss. I can say I know how it feels. I can also sense how not wanting to move on would be letting go of him. Somehow grieving allows you to hold on, even it’s in sadness. Indeed, I never knew it would affect me so deeply. I’ve never quite felt this sad before. I appreciate your support.

      Like

  11. Amy, you’ve been in my thoughts. I know how surreal things can be after the loss of someone we love… good for you to write, as you work through your grief. It’s so therapeutic.

    โ€œThe items remain the same. Theyโ€™re only rearrangedโ€ So powerful! This story captures the sense of loss and change you are experiencing. Sending love and caring thoughts. xox

    Like

  12. Sadness emanates from your story, Amy, reflecting your own personal loss. Time alone will heat that. I agree with others, above, who have commented on that wonderful line: “The items remain the same. They’re only rearranged.” It is beautiful and so meaningful wihin the context of the story.:)

    Like

  13. Amy, I can feel the cold unfamiliarity of the new situation in this story so clearly, the new things in unfamiliar locations.
    I didn’t put together when I saw the name with the picture that this Lauren was La La of Charm City Chick fame. I’m glad you brought it over here.
    I hope you have a good Easter, or at least as good as possible,
    David

    Like

  14. Dear Amy,

    Again, thanks for sharing Lauren’s photo.

    As you can read in my story, the losses still hurt years down the road. My mom died in 1981 and my dad in 1984. Can it really be thirty years plus? My brother and I still laugh when we tell stories about our parents to each other.

    Your story is poignant and well written. I hope it was cathartic for you. I’m sure your dad is beaming with pride from heaven at the lovely daughter he raised.

    Shalom,

    Rochelle

    Like

    1. Dear Rochelle,
      You’re so kind. Oh, I hope he’s beaming. I’m so glad I wrote. It always feels better when I write. It’s difficult to think this is the new normal for me. I still process it every morning. This is the price of loving someone, I suppose. It’s tough being human, isn’t it? I hope to cling to memories soon. It’s great you can share those with your brother. Life is about creating those memories, so I should look forward to those. Thanks for choosing the photo, too.
      Shalom,
      Amy

      Like

  15. Dear Amy,

    All those you love live on in your heart. They are there for you all the time. It’s not a good solution, but it’s a true one. I still talk to my parents and keep them close, even though they left this world long ago.

    A wonderful story, sad and rightly so, and reflective.

    Aloha,

    Doug

    Like

    1. Dear Doug,
      Thank you for this. It’s exactly what I needed to read right now. How did you know? I’d like think my dad isn’t gone, but that he’s just somewhere else and someday I’ll see him again. Until then, I will heed your words of truth. Thanks so much.
      Aloha,
      Amy

      Like

Take it away.

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s