No Batteries Required – Friday Fictioneers

Welcome to Friday Fictoneers, where every week writers attempt to create a 100-word story based on a photo. Thanks to Rochelle Wisoff-Fields for hosting the group each and every week. The photo was provided by Sean Fallon. Thank you, Sean.

This week’s prompt is a repeat from three years ago. Since many of you may not have seen this and because I’m satisfied with my story, I decided to repost it with a few minor changes. It feels good to like something that I wrote! I hope you enjoy it. 

If you would like to participate, click here for details.

copyight-sean-fallon
PHOTO PROMPT © Sean Fallon

(100 words)

No Batteries Required

“Do we have any batteries, Daddy?” she said, looking at the jar.

“No. Those are for recycled. And, since it’s filled to the top, I get to throw away three of your toys.” He laughed and patted her head.

The little girl gazed at him in disbelief, then sat on his lap. “Why? They’re not broken. They just need batteries.”

“So we don’t need anything new then?” he asked. “You can’t have it all. What’s it going to be? Batteries or new toys?”

The little girl held her ragged doll close to her chest. “You can’t throw away this one.”

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For more stories from the Fictioneers, click here. 

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74 thoughts on “No Batteries Required – Friday Fictioneers

  1. I agree with @Stephen Liddell — long live battery-free toys! It felt rather brutal there, though, for a moment, and I was worried about the little girl.
    I really enjoyed this story, Amy! Very imaginative.

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    1. I remember people felt it was a little brutal the last time I posted this.I want the tone to be more playful. Maybe I should reword it, although I’m sure it could sound pretty brutal to the little girl no matter what. Thanks so much.

      Liked by 1 person

      1. Yes, it has a more gentle feel!
        (I must say, though, it’s not your writing that made it “brutal” in the first place, but the threat of losing toys, something about which I’ve reassured my daughter many times when she was young. Long ago, when I said that when she got to be older, it would be nice to donate or give away some of her huge collection of toys, she cried, and I said I would never throw them away until she decided that it was time to let them go. That reassured her immensely, and when she got older, she chose quite properly the toys she wanted to part with, and would give them to a visiting friend or a friend’s family with a young child, and so on.)

        And in your story, the laugh and pat on the head mitigate that threat somewhat, but the little girl is NOT fooled, I think. 🙂

        I appreciate your openness!
        And I love your stories!

        Liked by 1 person

      2. Thanks so much for reading it again! I appreciate the feedback. Throwing away toys sounds so brutal, but I think it’s what a dad would say in a teasing kind of way. I’m all for donating. I’ll be honest with you. I wrote this three years ago, feeling overwhelmed by toys. Here it is, three years later, and I feel the same way! I can’t get my younger child to give anything up and he plays with probably less than half of them! Now, we have to move so we definitely are going to have some decisions to make. It’s kind of funny this story came up again. So timely.
        I agree. This little girl is NOT fooled. And thank you!

        Liked by 1 person

    1. Kids’ collections just seem to multiply on their own. It’s amazing when that happens. And then you realize you must clean them out someday! Thank you, Margaret. Glad you enjoyed it.

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  2. I like toys that don’t need batteries too–except for my fishing boat, which needed a new battery last week. Can’t remember if I read this one in 2012 or not, but I loved it today.

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    1. I bet your boat battery couldn’t fit in this jar. I can’t remember if you read it or not either. I can’t even remember what happened yesterday, Russell. 🙂 Glad you enjoyed it. Thank you!

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  3. I remember this picture, Amy, although I’m not sure if I read your story back in 2012. It was just before I started Friday Fictioneers myself and every week and I would see the same pictures showing up multiple times in my reading list. I like the nostalgia factor. Some things are better without batteries.

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    1. Oh, so you hadn’t done this one? I remember my first prompt was the cabin in the woods! I’m pretty sure. Now I have to check. I like the nostalgia, too. Some things don’t need to change at all or need blinking lights. Thank you, David.

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      1. Busy. Just trying to adjust to different circumstances. Rochelle and I are rewriting our play and I’m editing videos in addition to work. She called me a coward for not writing any flash fiction, so, we’ll see how this goes. I have missed you folks a lot.

        Liked by 1 person

    1. My kids have a lot battery-operated ones. Oi! But funny as it turns out, my younger son just loves stuffies. Those are his favorite. We still have the loud toys though, but they sit in the closet. 🙂 Thanks so much, Isadora. Glad you liked it.

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    1. Oh, no! I didn’t mean to make you sad. I guess thinking about a little girl losing a dolly would do that to you. I think of the dad as teasing her, but I’m sure you’re more sensitive with your girls. Thanks, Mark. The third eye, I bet. I have boys so I don’t get to experience that firsthand.

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    1. Oh, so sorry I didn’t respond! I’m losing my mind, Rochelle. I know you understand. 🙂 Thank you and thanks for the reread with your tremendously busy schedule. I appreciate you.

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  4. I see why some have found the Dad a little tough here. But it’s a truth – sometimes I’m shell-shocked by the amount of toys my grandkids have, and yet it always seem that the old favourites, the non-automatic ones, are the ones that survive. Good one Amy.

    Liked by 1 person

    1. I agree the dad is a little tough here. Perhaps he’s fed up with the frustration with the amount of toys. I think you know there are too many when your kids don’t even know what they have. Like you, I think the favorites tend to be the non-battery operated ones. They seem to be more meaningful. They can go on car rides and trips and keep kids company. Thanks, Sandra.

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  5. Everything needs batteries these days! And you can spend a lot of money on them just keeping them in stock. Here’s to the simpler toys and imagination! My daughter has one of those adult coloring books that is really beautiful. She bought it at the college bookstore and said they are really popular with students. She just came home for spring break and was coloring in it last night. Talk about memories coming back!
    Hope you are well and I hope you have a lovely Sunday! xo

    Liked by 1 person

    1. Well, you said it. Batteries aren’t cheap either. The worse thing is when a child opens a present and can’t play with it because you don’t have the batteries. I’ve seen parents include batteries with a present, for example, which is very kind of them. I always loved my dolls as a kid. They gave me countless hours of imaginative playtime. You know what, Kelly, I have one of those coloring books! It’s of the sea. I haven’t spent much time with it yet, but want to. Coloring is a great stress-reliever.
      Thanks, I hope you’re enjoying your Sunday, too! xoxo

      Liked by 1 person

      1. That’s so funny – I want one too! And the sea theme is perfect for you! My daughter uses colored pencils and the pages have such beautiful, intricate images on them. Hers has a fairytale theme. I agree completely about stress relief too! And who says we can’t be kids again?!! Next we’ll be buying Barbies or something! LOL!

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      2. The sea is perfect for me. I should try this coloring again. The first time it didn’t really take. I think it would be good for me to do it. Right, who says we can’t have as much fun as the kids?! Thanks, Kelly.

        Liked by 1 person

  6. We tried to keep battery operated toys out of our house, but it didn’t last long. :-/ Seems to me, though, that it would be better to replace batteries, than buy new toys! Such a slippery slope, and such a thought provoking story! Nice job!

    Liked by 1 person

    1. I agree, new batteries would be better, Dawn. I didn’t mind the battery operated toys so much, but they seem to just die eventually and even a new battery can’t bring them back to life. I’m in the midst of cleaning, including going through toys that my kids don’t play with anymore. Even when they move on, they still may not be ready to part with them. This is an old story, but very relevant for me today. Anyway, thanks so much! Glad you liked it.

      Liked by 1 person

  7. Good story, Amy. I didn’t buy many battery toys for my kids. My son sold some of his action figures when he grew up. There are people who collect them these days. My daughter wasn’t all that attached to her toys. I had to give some of them away when we downsized. She didn’t care as she was older by then. Well done. 🙂 — Suzanne

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    1. Suzanne, I currently need to downsize. My nine year old doesn’t want to get rid of anything even if he hasn’t played with it in years! Oh, what to do! Thank you. 🙂

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  8. I’ve never tried one of these prompts before – can they be laced with sarcasm? I’m not sure I can write any other way. Also I can’t use Donald Trump because unfortunately he is not fictional. Although I think he is an older version of Christian Grey from 50 Shades. Except his fingers are tiny.

    I like your story. Don’t let him take your doll, kid! Hit him with the jar of batteries.

    Liked by 1 person

    1. Oh, you should try it, Alice. Yes, definitely, they can be laced with sarcasm. I’ve seen Trumpesque stories or maybe even his name mentioned lately. That’s pretty funny to think of him as an older Christian Grey! Now that sounds like a good story!
      Thank you. Hit him with the batteries. That’s part 2 of the story. What happens next? No sniffles from this kid.

      Like

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