The Hiders of the Tin – Friday Fictioneers

Welcome to Friday Fictioneers. How exciting that my photo was chosen for today’s prompt. Thanks, Rochelle, for the honor of selecting my photo and for your dedication to this group.

Personally, I think storage units are strange, fascinating and a bit disturbing. This one gave me the creeps. But, I think generally storage units are places of transition, what we leave behind, can’t fit into our life, or simply don’t need or want. A lot of ideas about having stuff and what it all means came up for me, but it didn’t quite fit into a story and has nothing to do with what I came up with. 

In any case, I hope this photo inspired you.

Copyright Amy Reese
Copyright Amy Reese

(103 words)

Hiders of the Tin 

Marla hid in her storage unit. Like a visit with a sick relative, she never stayed long. Others hid, too. She had heard whispers, had felt their tears on her face. Usually, she left before that happened.

Her familiar brick of boxes was her refuge. She reached for her folding chair in the corner, but not before kicking a beat-up music box.

She picked it and said, “But this isn’t mine.” Quickly, she left to throw it away in a dumpster.

Returning home, she found the music box open on the table. A tiny dancer whirled to a creak of a song.

**********************

Thanks for reading. Please join in if you’d like or you can read more stories here from the Fictioneers.

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Weekly Photo Challenge: Creepy

I happen to have a lot of creepy photos, my lovelies. I’m not going to analyze why that is at this moment, but I would say my best creepy photos are from a tour of the Preston School of Industry, also known as the Preston Castle, in Ione, California. Here’s a post I did about it a while back. A few commenters had suggested that my post was not completely accurate. For the record, that post was based on information learned from my tour guide. It’s quite positive she glossed over some things.

When pressed, our docent admitted that were many unexplained deaths that happened on the premises. The former reform school for boys is thought to be haunted and, whether it was the power of suggestion or not, I felt a presence. It so happens this castle, once a school for wards of the state, may be transformed into a college for extension classes and a culinary school. If I were to ever take classes there, it would not be after dark.

These pictures were taken in 2013 when it was owned by the state of California. It currently is under the ownership of the Preston Castle Foundation, so I have no idea what the place looks like now. When I took the tour, it was in need of serious repair.

I chose what I thought were my most creepy and played with a few filters for a spooky effect. How did I do?

Creepy_PrestonCastle1Yes, you do see a hanging man on the right side of the photo. Don’t worry, it’s not real. It’s for a special Halloween sleepover. For a fee, you can spend the night!

Creepy_PrestonCastle5Would you like to spend the night here?

Creepy_PrestonCastle6The ghost was upstairs. True or not, the docent said that door opened and closed on its own.

Creepy_PrestonCastle2This is the infirmary, the only area of the castle that was intact. We were told that patients were given care here on the floor with no anesthesia. This room felt spooky and strange.

Creepy_PrestonCastle4This is the basement.

Creepy_PrestonCastle3Here’s the back of the castle.

I hope you enjoyed this little tour.

For more creepiness, visit the Weekly Photo Challenge site.

Link

Haunted Places: A Tour of Preston Castle

Recently, I visited the Preston Castle in Ione, California in Amador County for a historical tour. During the month of October, the Preston Castle also offers a thrilling haunted house and overnight ghost tours. This is not surprising considering it is believed to be truly haunted. Not only is there an unsolved murder in its past, but at least 26 suspicious deaths that occurred on the premises.

I found its history fascinating. The Preston Castle, formerly the Preston School of Industry, opened its doors as a reform school for boys in 1864. It is one of the oldest and best-known reform schools in the United States.

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The very first class at Preston. They look a bit grim.

Juveniles were sent to Preston instead of the nearby prisons of San Quentin or Folsom with the goal of rehabilitation, and thus, this amazing construction of the Romanesque Revival style architecture was envisioned and realized. Boys, aged from 12-24, were not named as prisoners or inmates, but were referred to as wards of the state or simply “wards.” Their crimes ranged from burglary to murder; orphaned boys also ended up here.

In 1890, the state of California purchased 230 acres (at only $30 per acre) for the Preston School. The plan included 77 rooms in all. The school was divided into three areas: academic, military, and industry trade. Everything they used at the school was produced onsite, including the butchering of animals for meals and the sewing their own clothes. Wards picked a trade to master such as agriculture, farming, printing, brick laying, plumbing, carpentry, or baking. The goal was for the wards to be productive members of society once released.

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Sitting on the steps with my son. It’s hard to capture the entire Castle in a photo.

Did you think you saw a man hanging from the top of the building? You did.

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Don’t worry. It’s just a prop for their Halloween Haunt.

Since the tours began, many visitors have cited strange sights, disembodied voices, slamming doors, and fallen objects. Paranormal events have also been documented on the Ghost Adventures TV show. I’m glad I decided to watch the creepy episode after my tour.

Take a look inside.

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Does it not look a bit spooky?
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I’m not going up there…

Because next year the deed for a 55-year lease will be in the hands of private citizens, this may the last year they open their doors for tours and their haunted house. Today much of the Castle is in complete disrepair.

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In many spots, whole floors are missing. Believe me, this tour requires a guide for safety alone.
Preston Castle 170
Once a staff apartment. It’s seen better days.

Preston Castle closed its doors in 1960, and in the years that followed the slate roof, considered to be of value, was torn off for monetary gain; the castle was vandalized and exposed to the elements. All except this room…what was once the hospital.

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Infirmary Room I. According to Ghost Adventures, this is a hot bed of paranormal activity.
Preston Castle 178
The ceiling, not exposed to the elements, is in good shape.

When our guide took us to down to the basement to the kitchen, she paused, then announced, “If there’s any reason why this place is haunted, it’s probably because of what happened here in this kitchen.”

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She then told the story of Anna Corbin, the Head Housekeeper on staff, who was believed to be murdered by nineteen-year-old ward, Eugene Monroe. She was found with a burlap sack over her head, tied with a cord around neck, and blugeoned to death. Eugene was tried three times and finally acquitted, and so Anna Corbin’s murder was never solved. Eugene Monroe was later incarerated in Oklahoma for the murder of another woman.

Preston Castle 218
A memorial now stands in the pantry.

It must have been a rough place with all the documented attempts of escape. While the goal of rehabilitation did not take hold in infamous serial killers, Gerald Gallego and Caryl Chessman, many more went on to live productive and successful lives.

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Preston Castle 240
Others left their mark by etching their names into this wall.

Only eight acres now remain of the school campus, including the Castle and the Fire House, which are listed as California State Historical Landmarks and are on the National Register of Historic Places. The rest of the surrounding area is home to the San Quentin Prison and the California Youth Authority Detention Center (now closed). Most of the acreage has been sold for homes and an accompanying sprawling golf course.

My tour guide remarked, “It’s a state town.” She questioned whether the restoration effort is worth it, but added, “People have a vision about this place.” The hope is to restore the Castle to its former glory and possibly convert it for extension programs for nearby college campuses.

No matter how it is restored, I have a feeling it will still be haunted.

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